vf-tropicom Meteorological Analysis for South Africa

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Seasonal Vegetation Index - 2005/2006

Seasonal vegetative index


Seasonal Rainfall - 2005/2006
in mm

Seasonal rainfall


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Preliminary Monthly Weather Analysis
Southern Africa - 2005/2006

From the African Desk, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA
Note: This information should be used with caution.
Weather data based on preliminary reports.

  • July 2006 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed over most areas, except for pockets of wetness in southwestern South Africa, northern Mozambique, and Madagascar. >
  • July 21-31 2006 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed except for light to moderate rains (4-83 mm) in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Moderate but unseasonable showers spread from central to northern Madagascar, while isolated showers fell over local areas on northern Mozambique. Temperatures were generally 1 to 3 degrees C above normal across South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, and along coastal Mozambique. They were 1 to 3 degrees C below average over Zimbabwe.
  • July 11-20 2006 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed except for light to moderate rains (4-50 mm) in western South Africa. Unusually heavy rains (50-80 mm, 200-300% of normal) hit the Capetown area. Temperatures averaged near normal except 3 to 5 degrees C above normal in the maize triangle.
  • July 1-10 2006 -
  • June 2006 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed for most areas, except for pockets of wetness in western and central South Africa, southern Botswana, and southern Mozambique. Monthly temperatures averaged near to slightly below normal.
  • June 21-30 2006 - Seasonably dry weather ruled, except for anomalous wetness in western and central South Africa and southern Botswana (5-60 mm, 100-800% of normal). Temperatures averaged 2 to 4 degrees C below normal from Botswana into Zimbabwe and Zambia, and close to normal elsewhere.
  • June 11-20 2006 - Seasonably dry weather continued to prevail across the region associated with cooler than normal temperatures (1 to 2 degrees C below average) in Zimbabwe, while temperatures were higher than normal (1-3 degrees C above the mean) in South Africa, Botswana, and Namibia.
  • June 1-10 2006 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed across the region associated with cooler than normal temperatures in Zimbabwe and Botswana, where temperature departures averaged 2 to 4 degrees C below normal. Temperatures in most of South Africa though, averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal.
  • May 2006 - It was abnormally wet (30-150 mm, 200-500% of normal) across western and southern South Africa. Seasonably dry weather ruled elsewhere. Temperatures averaged around 2 degrees C below normal.
  • May 21-31 2006 - Unusually cool autumn weather prevailed, as temperatures averaged 2 to 4 degrees C below normal, and a few locations reported 5 to 6-degree departures. Seasonably dry weather covered the region, except for 20 to 100 mm of rain (100-500% of normal) along the Cape Province coast of South Africa.
  • May 11-20 2006 - Unseasonably wet weather (15-80 mm, 150-900% of normal) again took hold across western and southern South Africa, alleviating dryness concerns for most of the Cape Province. Seasonably dry weather prevailed elsewhere in the region. Temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees below normal except near normal in Mozambique.
  • May 1-10 2006 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed except for abnormal rains (20-70 mm, 300-900% of normal) over the Cape Province of South Africa. This was the second consecutive period with above-normal rains in this region. The weather was cool, with temperatures averaging 2 to 3 degrees C below normal across most of southern Africa.
  • April 2006 - Rainfall exceeded 400% of normal from southern Angola into western Namibia, and even exceeded 600% of normal locally in interior western South Africa. The main maize-growing areas of South Africa measured 40 to 90 mm (100-180% of normal). Welcomed rains fell in the Western Cape area. Seasonably drier weather prevailed elsewhere. Some beneficial rains fell over the dry areas in southern Madagascar, but amounts failed to end the drought caused by earlier dryness. Temperatures average 1 to 3 degrees C below normal in Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Zambia, and near normal elsewhere.
  • April 21-30 2006 - Unseasonably wet and cool weather prevailed in many areas. Heavy rains (15-90 mm, 150-250% of normal) benefited dry areas in South Africa¬ís Western Cape Province, while moderate rains (10-30 mm, 150-300% of normal) covered central South Africa, including the maize triangle. Unseasonably wet weather also hit central Zimbabwe, which saw 20 to 50 mm (200-800% of normal). Beneficial moisture (10-50 mm) fell over parts of southern Madagascar. Following earlier heavy rains, light to moderate rains fell over Namibia and Angola. Regional temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal.
  • April 11-20 2006 - Unseasonably heavy rains (75-200 mm, over 400% of normal) struck western and northern Angola, with moderate to heavy rains also affecting Namibia (25-75 mm, over 400% of normal). Little or no rain fell across many areas of Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and northern South Africa, but this is not unusual for this time of the year. Unseasonably heavy rains covered central and southern South Africa (15-50 mm, 200-500% of normal) as well as northern Mozambique. Despite the abnormally wet weather over the interior of the Cape Provinces, seasonably light rains (0-6 mm) fell in the western portions of the Western Cape Province of South Africa, maintaining the large rainfall deficits incurred in recent months. Cumulative rainfall since January has been less than 40% of normal in the Capetown area. Variable amounts fell over Madagascar, but cumulative rainfall this month and for the past several months remained below normal in the south and southern half of the east coast. Temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal in Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana and near normal elsewhere.
  • April 1-10 2006 - As the rainy season has begun to wind down, little or no rain fell across most parts in the region, but is not likely to hamper favorable growing conditions this season. The exceptions to the light rains were northern Mozambique as well the southern coast, portions of northern Malawi, and southeastern Madagascar, where rainfall amounts ranged between 25 and 238 mm; 98-336% of normal). Isolated showers (13-48 mm; 88-110% of normal) also fell over portions of northwestern and central Zimbabwe, a few local areas in the Maize Triangle of South Africa. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated light to moderate rains (1-25 mm) across Angola, and portions of central Namibia and southern Botswana. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal.
  • March 11-20 2006 - Moderate to heavy rains (10-87 mm; 81-363% of normal) sustained moisture over most of the crop producing provinces of South Africa, including the Maize Triangle, Lesotho, and Swaziland. The rains extended northward to cover local areas in northwestern and southern Zimbabwe. Isolated moderate to heavy rains (46-247 mm; 83-294% of normal) also fell along coastal Mozambique as well as the northern areas, southern and northern Malawi, and the east coast of Madagascar. However, light rains (1-20 mm; 1-74% of normal) fell over central Malawi, most of central and eastern Zimbabwe, and the western provinces of South Africa. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated moderate to heavy rains (50-100 mm) continued to pound northern Namibia and western Botswana. The estimates were moderate (10-50 mm) across Angola and Zambia, and light (10-25 mm) over most of Madagascar. Temperatures generally averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal.
  • March 1-10 2006 - Rainfall distribution exhibited a dipole pattern with dry conditions south and west of Zimbabwe and wet conditions in the northeastern part of the region. Heavy rains (122-472 mm; 134-662% of normal) soaked portions of east coast Madagascar and coastal Mozambique. The rains were so intense that they caused flooding in local areas. Sizable amounts of rains (71-219 mm; 115-305% of normal) also fell over northern Mozambique and Malawi, while Zimbabwe and northeastern South Africa received beneficial rains (26-144 mm; 123-400% of normal). However, except local areas, light rains (1-13 mm; 4-65% of normal eased flooding concerns over portions of the Maize Triangle of South Africa. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated dry conditions across the western provinces of South Africa, Namibia, western and southern Botswana, and along the east coast of Angola. Heavy rains (75-150 mm) sustained moisture over most of Zambia. Temperatures were generally 2 to 3 degrees C below normal across the region.
  • February 2006 - Rainfall totals (98-266 mm; 83-247% of normal) confirmed the extremely favorable rainy season in most of South Africa, including the Maize Triangle, Swaziland, Lesotho, western Zimbabwe, Botswana, and eastern Namibia. Rainfall was also average to above average (271-619 mm; 86-155% of normal) along portions of both coast lines in Madagascar, as well as the northern areas. Lighter rains (32-109 mm; 12-35% of normal), though, fell over interior Madagascar. Most areas in Mozambique and Malawi also registered moisture deficit as rainfall amounts ranged between 3 and 178 mm (1-79% of normal). Satellite rainfall estimates indicated that eastern Angola and most of Zambia received sizable beneficial rains (150-250 mm). Lighter rains ((10-50 mm) fell over western Angola, while dry conditions prevailed in the coastal areas. Local areas in southern and central Tanzania also received below normal rainfall.
  • February 21-28 2006 - Moderate to heavy rains (21-220 mm; 85-386% of normal) fell over northern and central Zimbabwe, and many areas in South Africa, including, the Maize Triangle and portions of the Kwazulu/Natal Province. The heavy rains resulted in flooding in some areas in the Mpumalanga Province. Lesotho and Swaziland received 127-189 mm (479-500% of normal), while a short lived tropical storm brought moderate to heavy rains (46-189 mm; 97-152% of normal) over northern Madagascar and along the east coast. Satellite rainfall estimates also indicated moderate to heavy rains (25-75 mm) across Namibia, southeastern Angola, western Zambia, and southern Botswana. However, southeastern Zimbabwe, northern Malawi, and northern Mozambique as well as the southern coastal areas received lighter than normal rains (3-34 mm; 27-71% of normal). Dry conditions prevailed over portions of central and southern Mozambique, the Western Cape Province of South Africa, southwestern Namibia, and along the coast of Angola. Temperatures departures generally averaged 1 to 2 degrees C below normal over South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • January 11-20 2006 - The heavy rains in December continued over central Mozambique, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and northern Botswana as these areas received 35-127 mm (88-248% of normal). Northern Namibia received unusually high amounts of rainfall (75-150 mm). These rains extended northward to cover southern and western Angola. Moderate to heavy rains (50-100 mm) also benefited central and western Tanzania, and Swaziland. Moderate to heavy rains (43-141 mm; 96-286% of normal) fell in local areas in the northeastern provinces of South Africa, and most of southeastern South Africa received beneficial rains (25-72 mm; 82-306% of normal). However, most of Maize Triangle in South Africa, Lesotho, portions of northern and southern Mozambique, and eastern Botswana registered below normal rainfall (3-24 mm; 8-70% of normal). Most of Madagascar also recorded below normal rainfall (16-87 mm; 25-62% of normal). Temperature departures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal across the region.
  • December 2005 - Rainfall was quite variable and the heaviest amounts confined to Zimbabwe, central and southern Mozambique, and central and eastern Madagascar. Rainfall amounts in those areas ranged between 121 and 595 mm (90-298% of normal). Spotty moderate to heavy rains also fell locally over the Northern Transvaal and the Northwestern Cape provinces of South Africa. Elsewhere in South Africa, rainfall was below normal and ranged between 9 and 131 mm (2-73% of normal) across most areas in the Maize Triangle. Rainfall was also light to moderate (49-111 mm; 26-64% of normal) across most of northern Mozambique and Malawi. Moderate to heavy rains (63-269 mm; 93-307% of normal) soaked local areas in northern and southern Botswana, while light rains 2-44 mm; 4-63% of normal) fell across Namibia. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated moderate to heavy rains (100-300 mm) across most of Angola and Zambia.
  • December 21-31 2005 - The dryness in East Africa extended southward to cover eastern Tanzania, where dryness prevailed. However, rainfall estimates ranged between 10 and 75 mm in the west. Elsewhere, moderate to heavy rains (81-190 mm) fell over most of central and eastern Zimbabwe, northern and central Mozambique, and pockets over the northeastern provinces of South Africa. Moderate to heavy rains (126-215 mm; 108-200% of normal) also fell over portions of central and southeastern Madagascar. However, in Madagascar, rainfall deficits occurred along the northeast coast as totals ranged between 56 and 85 mm (55-73% of normal). Most of South Africa, including the Maize Triangle also experienced moisture deficits with rainfall amounts between 2 and 53 mm (14-78% of normal). Dry conditions prevailed across the Western Cape Province and southern Namibia. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 10-25 mm over pockets in central and northern Namibia. Rainfall estimates ranged between 10 and 25 mm over southern Botswana. They were heavier (75-150 mm) over northern Botswana, most of Zambia, and southeastern Angola. The estimates ranged between 10 and 75 mm over most of central and northern Angola, while dry conditions prevailed in the southwest. Temperatures were generally 1 to 3 degrees C below normal across South Africa and Mozambique.
  • December 11-20 2005 - Rainfall was quite variable and scattered moderate rains (21-94 mm; 86-216% of normal) covered portions of central Zimbabwe. Overall, rainfall was below normal across South Africa, although spotty showers (22-94 mm; 92-152% of normal) fell over local areas in most of the provinces, except the west, where seasonable dryness prevailed. Extremely heavy rains (104-221 mm; 254-456% of normal) fell along the southern coastline of Mozambique, while local areas along the northern coastline received between 49 and 69 mm (81-86% of normal). The east coast and central Madagascar also received sizable rainfall amounts between 65 and 167 mm (84-175% of normal). Much lighter rains (17-41 mm; 24-71% of normal) fell over northern and eastern Zimbabwe and over portions of northern Mozambique, and eastern Zambia. Satellite rainfall estimation indicated 10-50 mm across Malawi, most of northern Mozambique. Rainfall estimates were much heavier (75-200 mm) across central Mozambique and central Angola. They were lighter and ranged between 10 and 25 mm across Botswana, northern Namibia, and portions of western Zambia. Dry conditions prevailed across central and southern Namibia.
  • December 1-10 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (21-290 mm; 98-555% of normal) soaked most of Zimbabwe, portions of southern Mozambique, including the coastal areas, and the Northern Transvaal Province of South Africa. However, light rains (5-36 mm; 7-52% of normal) fell across most of the Maize Triangle, and dry conditions prevailed across most of the Free State and western provinces of South Africa. Locally moderate to heavy rains 80-213 mm; 96-251% of normal) fell over central Madagascar and along portions of the southeast and northeast coasts. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated heavy downpours (50-150 mm) over northern Botswana, most of Malawi, central and southern Zambia, and central Angola. The estimates were lighter (10-25 mm) over northern Namibia, southern and northwestern Angola, and central Botswana. Dry conditions prevailed over the southern areas of Namibia and Botswana, and over extreme northeast Mozambique. Temperatures were generally 1 to 3 degrees C below average across the region, except over northern Mozambique, where they were 2 to 3 degrees C above normal.
  • November 2005 - Thanks to the late-month pickup in moisture, the regionís monthly rainfall totals neared or topped the 100 percent of normal mark for most areas. South Africaís maize triangle saw only 25-75 mm (45-80 percent of normal) in the north, but the rest of the triangle measured 50-150 mm (80-150 percent of normal). Rainfall was near to above normal in southern Malawi, where drought damaged the maize crop early this year. To the south, however, monthly totals fell short of normal, as central Mozambique recorded around 25-75 mm (50-75 percent of normal). Zimbabwe¬ís totals of 50-100 mm (60-100 percent of normal) in the main maize belt tended to be slightly below normal. Temperatures were mostly near normal across southern Africa.
  • November 21-30 2005 - Abundant rains fell across the region, with amounts of 25 to 100 mm (125-400 percent of normal) extending over a broad expanse from South Africa through Botswana, northern and western Zimbabwe, eastern Namibia, western Zambia, and southern Angola. Good rains (25-50 mm, 80-110 percent of normal) also dampened Malawi and far southern Mozambique. Below-normal rains (10-25 mm, 10-75 percent of normal) fell over southern Zimbabwe and most of central and southern Mozambique. Temperatures ranged from 2 degrees C above normal in South Africa to around 2 degrees C below normal in Zimbabwe.
  • November 1-10 2005 - The rainy season is up to a good start in most of Zimbabwe as light to moderate rains (13-46 mm; 93-354% of normal) persisted over the northern and southern areas of the country. Lighter rains (3-16 mm; 10-69% of normal) fell in the southeastern sector as well as along the coastal areas of Mozambique and Madagascar. Isolated light to moderate rains (14-40 mm; 80-318% of normal) fell over local areas in northern Mozambique, southern Malawi, and most of Botswana. In South Africa, moderate to heavy rains (23-361 mm; 82-265% of normal) persisted over the Kwazulu/Natal province. The rains extended northward to cover the Transvaal, Mpumalanga, Gauteng, and parts of the Free State province. Lighter rains (1-14 mm) fell in the western provinces. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated dry conditions over Namibia, while most of Angola and Zambia received moderate to heavy rains (25-100 mm). The rainfall estimates ranged between 10 and 25 mm across interior central Mozambique. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C below normal across the region.
  • October 2005 - Seasonable dryness prevailed across the region, except the Kwazulu/Natal province of South Africa and Lesotho, where rainfall amounts ranged between 44 and 295 mm (86-124% of normal). Light to moderate rains (6-40 mm) also fell across most of the Maize Triangle of South Africa.
  • October 21-31 2005 - Seasonable dryness continued to prevail across the northern half of the region. However, light to moderate rains (25-29 mm; 116-160% of normal) fell locally over portions of eastern Zimbabwe. Moderate to heavy rains sustained moisture over portions of the Kwazulu/Natal province of South Africa, while light or no rain fell in the remainding parts of South Africa and Madagascar. Temperatures averaged 2 to 3 degrees C below normal across Zimbabwe, Zambia, and northern Mozambique. They were about 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across South Africa.
  • October 11-20 2005 - Seasonable dryness continued to prevail across the northern half of the region, while rainfall gradually increases in portions of South Africa. Moderate to heavy rains (32-88 mm; 90-248% of normal) fell over the Kwazulu/Natal province, while portions of the northeastern provinces received between 20 and 45 mm (84-193% of normal). Mid-latitude frontal systems brought light to moderate rains (4-32 mm) across the Western Cape Province. Elsewhere, light to moderate but unseasonable rains (6-22 mm) fell locally over northern and southern Mozambique. Light rains fell along the east coast of Madagascar. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana. They were about 1 to 2 degrees C below average across Zimbabwe.
  • October 1-10 2005 - Seasonable dryness prevailed across the region, although a mid-latitude frontal system brought moderate to heavy rains (22-60 mm; 93-168% of normal) over parts of the Kwazulu/Natal provinces of South Africa, while lighter rains fell in the Free State Province. Moderate rains (10-42 mm; 33-223% of normal) also fell along portions of the east coast of Madagascar. Temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal across the region.
  • September 2005 - Dry conditions prevailed across the region, except a few areas in northern and central Zimbabwe, southern Malawi, portions of coastal Mozambique, where rainfall was sometimes locally heavy. Moderate to heavy rains (132-226 mm; 171-199% of normal) also fell along the east coast of Madagascar. Elsewhere in Madagascar, rainfall was light in the range between 7 and 39 mm (2-9% of normal). Light to moderate rains (3-38 mm; 11-74% of normal) also fell over the Kwazulu/Natal and Western Cape provinces of South Africa.
  • September 21-30 2005 - Seasonable dryness prevailed across most of the region. However, unseasonably heavy rains (95-110 mm) hit local areas along the southern coast of Mozambique, while most areas along the Mozambique coast line received 6-20 mm (105-237% of normal). Unseasonable rains (35-45 mm) also fell locally over southern Malawi, while northeastern Zimbabwe received 3-9 mm. Light rains fell in the Kwazulu/Natal and Western Cape provinces of South Africa and the east coast of Madagascar received 15-37 mm (96-302% of normal). Temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal across the region.
  • September 11-20 2005 - Seasonably dry weather prevailed across most of continental southern Africa and Madagascar. However, light to moderate rains (13-53 mm; (31-94% of normal) fell along the eastern coast of Madagascar). Light rains also fell along the southern coast of South Africa. Temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C above normal across South Africa and Namibia. They were 1 to 3 degrees C below average across Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Madagascar.
  • September 1-10 2005 - Abnormally heavy rains (10-46 mm, 102-688 percent of normal) hit portions of the Kwazulu/Natal province of South Africa and locally along the east coast of Madagascar, while seasonable rains fell along the southern coast of the Western Cape province. Seasonably dry weather prevailed elsewhere in the region. Unseasonably warm weather (temperatures 2 to 4 degrees C above normal) continued to prevail across interior Namibia, Botswana, northern and central South Africa, southern Zimbabwe and most of Mozambique.
  • August 2005 - Seasonably dry conditions prevailed except in western and southern portions of South Africa, which experienced abnormally heavy rains (20-90 mm, 200-500 percent of normal). Temperatures were unremarkable except for around 2 degrees C above normal in southern South Africa and adjacent Zimbabwe.
  • August 21-31 2005 - Abnormally heavy rains (12-42 mm, 200-500 percent of normal) hit western and southern parts of South Africa. Interior areas in the central and northern parts of South Africa were mainly dry. Seasonably dry weather prevailed elsewhere in southern Africa. Unseasonably warm weather (temperatures 2 to 4 degrees C above normal) covered interior Namibia, Botswana, northern and central South Africa, southern Zimbabwe and most of Mozambique.
  • August 11-20 2005 - Seasonably dry weather continued to prevail, although isolated showers fell over portions of the Kwazulu/Natal and the Western Cape provinces of South Africa. Temperatures averaged 2 to 4 degrees C above normal over northern South Africa, most of Zimbabwe and Botswana. They were 2 to 3 degrees C below average across western South Africa and southern Namibia.
  • August 1-10 2005 - Seasonably dry weather continued to prevail, although isolated showers fell over portions of the Kwazulu/Natal and the Western Cape provinces of South Africa. Temperatures averaged 2 to 4 degrees C above normal over interior South Africa and Namibia. They were 1 to 2 degrees C below normal across Zimbabwe.
  • July 2005 - Seasonably dry conditions prevailed, although amounts in the winter crop areas of Cape Province tended to be below normal (1-30 mm, 2-75 percent of normal). Temperatures averaged around 2 degrees C above normal in Namibia and western South Africa.
  • July 21-31 2005 - Seasonably dry weather extended across the region. Temperatures averaged around 2 to 4 degrees C above normal over interior South Africa and Namibia.
  • July 11-20 2005 - Heavy rains hit western Cape areas, as reported amounts reached as high as 87 mm east of Capetown. Rainfall was negligible over most other parts of the region, as is typical for this time of the year. Temperatures averaged 2 to 5 degrees C above normal in Namibia and western South Africa.
  • July 1-10 2005 - Seasonably dry weather dominated the region, although scattered heavy showers (40-70 mm) peppered the coast of Mozambique. Cool weather covered northern areas, as Zimbabwe and Botswana saw readings average 2 to 4 degrees C below normal. In contrast, South Africaís Cape Province and southern Namibia observed temperatures averaging 2 to 5 degrees C above normal.

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