vf-tropicom Meteorological Analysis for East Africa

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Seasonal Vegetation Index

(Note differences in months due to timing of seasons)

Seasonal vegetative index Seasonal vegetative index


Seasonal Rainfall

(Note differences in months due to timing of seasons)

Seasonal rainfall Seasonal rainfall


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Preliminary Monthly Weather Analysis
Eastern Africa and the Horn

From the African Desk, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA
Note: This information should be used with caution.
Weather data based on preliminary reports.

  • September 2006 - Above normal rains (172-284; 93-138 % of normal) fell over the western Ethiopia Plateau, while lighter rains (23-70 mm; 42-120% of normal) fell in most of the central areas. Spotty moderate to heavy rains (86-220 mm; 85-213% of normal) fell over portions of Sudan, while most areas registered 7-69 mm (15-71% of normal). Light rains (20-65 mm; 18-42% of normal) fell over most of Uganda. Above normal rainfall (36-205 mm; 85-284% of normal) soaked southwestern, portions of central, and coastal Kenya. Drier conditions prevailed to the north. >
  • September 21-30 2006 - Moderate to heavy rains (52-95 mm; 101-273% of normal) sustained moisture surplus in the western Ethiopian Plateau. However, below normal rainfall (2-57 mm; 19-75% of normal) continued to prevail in the Shewa Province in the central areas. Unseasonably moderate rains (10-72 mm; 148-857% of normal) show signs to a good start in the short rains in central and portions of southwestern Kenya. Coastal areas in Kenya and southward to Tanzania also registered sizable amounts of rains (40-145 mm; 313-249% of normal). Scattered moderate to heavy showers (19-98 mm; 93-260% of normal) fell locally in west central Uganda and in local areas around the Lake Victoria basin. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above normal over southwestern Kenya.
  • September 11-20 2006 - Moderate to heavy showers (34-95 mm; 81-131% of normal) continued to douse most of the western Ethiopian Plateau, while isolated moderate rains (29-41 mm, 87-228% of normal) fell over portions of the central areas. However, below normal rainfall covered most of the Shewa Province near Addis Ababa. Light to moderate rains (2-25 mm; 14-79% of normal) fell over most of Sudan, except isolated showers in the east central (43 mm) and in the south (44-100 mm; 155-246% of normal). Abnormally heavy showers (31-100 mm; 127-375% of normal) pounded local areas in southwest Kenya, and the east coast received 20-33 mm (146-154% of normal). Central Kenya as well as local areas in eastern Uganda and northern Tanzania received 2-46 mm). Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • August 2006 - Wet conditions prevailed in Ethiopia, where totals of 200 to 300 mm (100-200% of normal) covered much of the western highlands. Near to above-normal rains fell over Eritrea, and well above-normal rains fell in Djibouti and adjacent portions of northern Somalia. Unusually high totals also registered in parts of southern Somalia. Seasonably dry weather prevailed in southeastern Ethiopia and eastern Kenya, but abnormally heavy rains (25-150 mm, 100-900% of normal) fell in central and northwestern Kenya. The unseasonable rains extended into northeastern Uganda. Sudan saw below-normal rains (50-150 mm, 50-75% of normal) in the east-central and northeastern crop areas, but above-normal rains in the southeast and west. Temperatures averaged near normal.
  • August 21-31 2006 - Abnormally heavy rains (50-150 mm, 110-150% of normal) continued across Ethiopia and Eritrea, and spread into Djibouti and adjacent portions of northern Somalia. The report of 108 mm in Djibouti was over 1,000% of normal. Unusually wet weather (10-25 mm, over 400% of normal) also hit scattered areas of central and southern Somalia, including the Mogadishu area. Long-term drought continued in parts of Somalia and southeastern Ethiopia, as well as in central and eastern Kenya. Seasonably dry weather dominated southeastern Ethiopia and the pastoral areas of Kenya. This period saw below-normal rainfall (10-50 mm, 10-75% of normal) in many parts of Sudan, especially in the east. This was part of a trend toward below normal rainfall in the northeastern agricultural areas of Sudan during August. Temperatures averaged near normal.
  • August 11-20 2006 - Seasonal rains with moderate to heavy downpours (48-116 mm; 98-161% of normal) continued to soak west and central Ethiopia. The heavy rains caused flooding in local areas, especially in the Omo River valley in the southwest. Scattered thunderstorm activity poured moderate to heavy rains (30-76 mm; 94-155% of normal) over portions of eastern, central Sudan, and western Sudan. These rains were particularly welcomed in the Darfur Region. Further to the south, seasonable dryness prevailed across Uganda and the northern areas of Kenya. Isolated light to moderate rains (6-48 mm; 97-333% of normal) fell over parts of central and southwestern Kenya, and along the coast. Temperature departures averaged 1 degree C above normal over Kenya.
  • August 1-10 2006 - Moderate rains (38-50 mm; 92-96% of normal) brought some relief to local areas in the Darfur region of Sudan. However, light rains (1-25 mm) sustained moisture deficit along the border with Chad. Light or no rain (0-35 mm; 0-54%) also increased the cumulative seasonal rainfall deficit in many areas over central Sudan, except a few local areas where rainfall amounts were between 43 and 45 mm (85-108% of normal). However, satellite rainfall estimates indicated widespread heavy showers (50-100 mm) in the agricultural areas of southern Sudan. The western half of Ethiopia also continued to enjoy beneficial rains, although the northern part registered the heaviest amounts (94-113 mm; 82-125% of normal). Local areas in the central part of the country also received 80-92 mm; 103-124% of normal). Unseasonable moderate rains (21-70 mm; 114-357% of normal) continued to soak the areas in the vicinity of Lake Victoria, including southwestern Kenya, southern Uganda, and Rwanda. Lighter rains (1-23 mm; 7-77% of normal) fell in central Kenya, while seasonable dryness prevailed over the eastern half of the country, eastern Ethiopia, Somalia, and most of Tanzania. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal over Kenya.
  • July 2006 - Rainfall totaled above normal in central and western Ethiopia, and in eastern Sudan, while further to the west, light rains sustained moisture deficit over the Darfur region. Light to moderate rains (10-50 mm) fell over northwestern and central Eritrea, while lighter rains fell in the southeast and over Djibouti. Seasonable dry weather prevailed over eastern Ethiopia, most of Somalia, Kenya, and Tanzania, except a few isolated showers along coastal areas in Kenya and Tanzania. Southwestern Kenya and Uganda also received rainfall totals between 50 and 100 mm.
  • July 21-31 2006 - Light or no rain (0-3 mm; 0-6% of normal) worsened dry conditions over the Darfur region of Sudan. Rainfall amounts were higher (12-45 mm; 38-98% of normal) in central and eastern Sudan, but still below average in most areas. Moderate to heavy rains (42-292% of normal) soaked western and central Ethiopia bringing about once again flood threats along the Blue Nile basin. Moderate rains but unseasonable rains (9-73 mm; 118-517% of normal) fell over Rwanda, eastern Uganda and the vicinity of Lake Victoria, and locally over southwestern Kenya. Seasonable rains (18-300 mm; 86-116% of normal) fell along coastal Kenya into northeastern Tanzania. Lighter rains (1-25 mm; 11-78% of normal) fell across most of Kenya, while seasonable dryness prevailed over interior Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated moisture deficit over northern Eritrea, while southern Eritrea and Djibouti received 1-25 mm. Seasonable dryness prevailed over Somalia. Temperatures departures averaged 1 degrees C above normal across Kenya. They were 1 to 2 degrees C below average over Uganda.
  • July 11-20 2006 - Seasonal rainfall amounts fell across the region, with the heaviest rains (up to 150 mm) in southwestern Sudan and over western and central Ethiopia (40-100 mm, 60-120% of normal). Amounts were around one-half of the totals estimated during July 1-10 in western Ethiopia, reducing the flood threat in the Blue Nile basin. With the exception of northern Darfur, most of Sudanís agricultural areas saw above normal rainfall. Estimated rainfall totaled around 10 to 25 mm (25-50% or normal) in northern Darfur. Seasonably dry weather covered most of Somalia, southern Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania. Light rains (1-25 mm) fell in Uganda. Temperatures were near normal.
  • July 1-10 2006 -
  • June 2006 - Rainfall totaled above normal in Sudanís northern agricultural areas and near normal elsewhere in Sudan. Darfurís northern agricultural areas saw estimated totals at least twice normal. Farther east, above-normal rains (10-50 mm, 100-400% of normal) fell in central Somalia, helping to ease the long-term drought. Seasonal rains covered most of Ethiopia, except for north-central and northeastern areas, where amounts were light (0-30 mm). Rainfall totals in Uganda were below normal (8-40 mm, 8-50% of normal) and generally below normal in Kenya, allowing long-term drought to persist in eastern Kenya. Temperatures averaged 2 to 3 degrees C below normal in southern Kenya, but near normal elsewhere.
  • June 21-30 2006 - Seasonably dry weather covered Somalia, southern and southeastern Ethiopia, and the pastoral areas of Kenya. Above-normal rains hit western Ethiopia (75-130 mm, 100-200% of normal), while western Kenya experienced seasonably variable amounts of rain (0-30 mm, 0-190% of normal. Northeastern and north-central Ethiopia recorded 0 to 35 mm of rain (0-170% of normal). In Sudan, the south measured generally normal rainfall (25-75 mm), but central areas tended to be on the dry side (0-30 mm, 0-120% of normal). Temperatures averaged near normal except 1 to 3 degrees above normal in central Sudan.
  • June 11-20 2006 - Beneficial rains (12-97 mm; 95-277% of normal) fell over many areas in central Ethiopia and west central Sudan, while rainfall amounts averaged 50-100 mm in the western highlands according to the satellite rainfall estimates. Rainfall estimates were also moderate to heavy (25-100 mm) across southern Sudan, with the heaviest amounts (75-100 mm) in the area south of Darfur. Rainfall was light but seasonable in southwestern Kenya. However, isolated moderate to heavy showers 19-79 mm; 216-251% of normal) fell in areas in the vicinity of Lake Victoria. Unseasonably heavy rains (45-93 mm; 133-811% of normal) also pounded local coastal areas in Kenya and northeastern Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 10-50 mm over northern Uganda, while seasonable dryness prevailed in the southwest as well as in Rwanda, Burundi, and interior Tanzania. Seasonable dry weather also prevailed over northern Kenya, eastern Ethiopia, and most of southern Somalia. Light rains (1-10 mm) fell over portions of northern Somalia, Djibouti, and Eritrea. Temperatures were generally 1 to 3 degrees C above normal over Kenya.
  • June 1-10 2006 - Light to moderate rains (2-48 mm; 36-91% of normal) spread across the central areas in Ethiopia, except for isolated areas in the south that received rainfall amounts above 150% of normal. Although early in the season, central Sudan experienced below normal from east to west, while seasonable dryness still prevails in the north. Negligible rains over southwestern Kenya and dry conditions in the northern and eastern areas, as well as across Uganda marked the demise of the long rains in this region. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated seasonable dryness over Rwanda, Burundi, and most of Tanzania. Light rains (1-25 mm) fell over central Somalia, Djibouti, and portions of northern Eritrea. Temperatures were near normal over Kenya. They were 1 to 2 degrees C below normal across Uganda.
  • May 2006 - Rainfall was generally near to above normal except for northern Kenya, central and northern Ethiopia, and interior central Somalia and adjacent areas in southeastern Ethiopia. These areas measured less than 50% of normal rainfall for the month. Thanks largely to anomalous wetness in mid-May, monthly rainfall was more than twice normal in northeastern Sudan. Temperatures averaged near to slightly below normal.
  • May 21-31 2006 - Heavy showers (50-150 mm, 70-200% of normal) fell over western Ethiopia, while negligible rain fell over north-central areas, and light showers (1-25 mm) peppered the drought-affected areas in the southeast. Although north-central Ethiopia has been dry since mid-May, a break in the rains is typical from May into early June in this part of the country. To the east, beneficial showers spread across northern and central Somalia, but satellite rainfall estimates indicated continued rainfall deficits this season in parts of interior central Somalia. Despite a drop-off in the rain over much of southern Somalia, seasonal accumulations remained generally near to above-normal. Drier weather prevailed in Kenya away from some heavy showers along the coast and the west. Cumulative rainfall since March 1 has been near to above normal over southern, coastal, and extreme northern Kenya, while long-term deficits remained in some pastoral areas in the north and east. Above-normal rains extended from southern Sudan into Uganda. Tanzania reported seasonably dry weather. Drier weather returned to central Sudan, including Darfur Province. Regional temperatures averaged near to slightly below normal, except slightly above normal in central Sudan.
  • May 11-20 2006 - Showers (10-50 mm, 100-200% of normal) benefited Somalia, including the dry areas in central and northern Somalia. More rain is needed, however, in central and northern areas of the country, where estimated cumulative rainfall since March has totaled around 50% of normal, according to satellite estimates. Similar beneficial rains also affected southern Ethiopia, easing long-term drought, but significant seasonal deficits remained in extreme southeastern parts of the country, which generally saw less than 25 mm this period. Dry weather prevailed over central parts of Ethiopia, but a dry period is not uncommon from the last half of May well into June as the belg rains end. Beneficial to locally excessive rains fell over western Ethiopia, amounts locally exceeding 100 mm. To the west, with the ITCZ advancing north of normal, rains spread into much of southern Darfur in western Sudan and as far north as Khartoum and beyond in eastern Sudan. Dry weather prevailed in northern and eastern Kenya, allowing drought to continue in some pastoral areas, but above-normal rains again fell in the southwest, near Lake Victoria. Above-normal rains (50-150 mm) extended from Uganda into Burundi, Rwanda, and western Tanzania. Temperatures averaged near to slightly below normal across the region.
  • May 1-10 2006 - Heavy showers (50-200 mm, 110-320% of normal) hit southwestern Kenya near Lake Victoria as well as south-central, southern, and south coastal areas of the country. Although the excessive rainfall increased the risk of flooding, the moisture further diminished the area of long-term drought, as did moderate to heavy showers (25-75 mm, 100-200% of normal) across southern Ethiopia and southern Somalia. Drought continued over some pastoral areas of northern, central, and eastern Kenya, as well as southeastern Ethiopia and central Somalia, as these areas saw generally less than 10 mm of rain this period. Rainfall was also negligible over northern Somalia, in contrast to widespread showers the preceding period. Abundant rains covered most of the crop areas of Ethiopia, including those western areas that had started off on a dry note this season. Heavy to excessive rains of up to 200 mm struck coastal Tanzania, but more moderate rains (25-75 mm) fell across northern Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. Above-normal rains (50-100 mm) fell across southern Sudan, benefiting some areas that had seen a slow start to the seasonal rains, but the showers may have triggered local flooding. The rains advanced northward into Darfur, but it is uncertain if the rainy season has begun or if these are pre-season showers. Temperatures averaged near to slightly below normal over the region, except for 2 to 4 degrees C above normal in central Sudan.
  • April 2006 - Heavy rains brought major drought relief and some flooding to this region. The greatest totals (over 300 mm) accumulated in southern Ethiopia, northeastern and western Kenya, southern Somalia, and southern and eastern Tanzania. Monthly rainfall exceeded normal from Eritrea southward through Ethiopia, southern Somalia, Kenya, eastern and southern Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and Tanzania. Although nearly the entire region saw above-normal rains this month, the rains were slow to move into western Ethiopia and southern Sudan, and these areas experienced below-normal moisture. Temperatures region-wide averaged near normal except for 2 to 3 degrees C below normal in Uganda and western Kenya and 2 to 3 degrees C above normal in Sudan.
  • April 21-39 2006 - Heavy showers (50-100 mm, 110-150% of normal) spread across southern Ethiopia and into adjacent portions of northeastern Kenya. Satellite-estimated rainfall exceeded 200 mm locally in extreme southern Somalia, with more moderate rains (25-75 mm) over the rest of the country. Other parts of Ethiopia generally saw normal to above-normal rains (10-50 mm, 70-160% of normal), while abnormally dry weather (0-15 mm, 0-50% of normal) continued in western Ethiopia (Benishangul and western Oromiya regions). Outside of the latter area, the belg and main rainy seasons have been progressing well in Ethiopia, and plentiful rains have also characterized the Somalia rainy season. Besides the northeast, Kenya also measured heavy rains (50-190 mm, 100-260% of normal) near Lake Victoria, the central highlands, and along the eastern coast. Flooding has been reported in Kenya, but long-term drought persisted in parts of eastern Kenya, eastern Ethiopia, and portions of Somalia. Farther west, heavy rains (75-100 mm) covered eastern Uganda, while in Tanzania rainfall varied from negligible in central areas to excessive (over 200 mm) along the east coast. In Sudan, drier-than-normal weather continued across south-central areas, and seasonably dry weather prevailed from Darfur eastward. Seasonably heavy rains (25-75 mm) fell across the south. Regional temperatures were mostly near normal except 1 to 3 degrees C below normal in Uganda and 2 to 4 degrees C above normal in Sudan outside of the south.
  • April 11-20 2006 - In contrast to the previous period, rainfall was light (0-25 mm, 0-25% of normal) over the pastoral areas of northern and eastern Kenya, as well as eastern Ethiopia and central and northern Somalia. Satellite-estimated totals of 10 to 50 mm covered southern Somalia, but these amounts were generally below normal for this time of the year, when the main rainy season is becoming established. Variable but mostly seasonal rainfall (5-60 mm, 30-200% of normal) fell across the crop-growing areas of Ethiopia, except for a portion of western Ethiopia, which saw negligible rains and where the rainy season has been delayed. This is part of an area that has seen dry weather this month that extends across southern Sudan north of Equatoria. Above-normal rains fell across western Kenya (75-150 mm, 110 to 200% of normal), extreme southern Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, and much of Tanzania. Despite pockets of improvement from the heavy downpours in early April, long-term drought persisted in much of eastern Kenya, southeastern Ethiopia, and southern and central Somalia. Temperatures generally averaged near normal except around 2 degrees C below normal in Uganda and southwestern Kenya.
  • April 1-10 2006 - Much needed rains fell across the drought laden areas in Kenya. The northern sector received unusually heavy rains (35-302 mm; 274-628% of normal). Moderate to heavy showers (59-142 mm; 11-205% of normal) also soaked the central and southwestern areas. Beneficial rains (20-120 mm; 101-418% of normal) fell over southern and central Ethiopia, while the western and far eastern areas remained dry, save local areas that received light rains (2-13 mm; 3-22% of normal). Satellite rainfall estimates indicated heavy downpours (100-250 mm) as well over eastern and western Tanzania, which helped alleviate any residual dryness in this region. Heavy rains (100-200 mm) also sustained moist soils over southern Somalia. Rainfall estimates ranged between 50 and 100 mm across Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, northwestern Somalia, Djibouti, and eastern Eritrea. They were lighter locally over northeastern and southwestern Tanzania. Seasonable dryness prevailed most of Sudan, western Eritrea, and northern Somalia. Temperatures averaged 1 to 3 degrees C below normal over most of Kenya and Ethiopia.
  • March 11-20 2006 - Wet conditions slowed down in southwest Kenya as most location registered little or no rain. Amounts ranged between 1 and 14 mm (5-38% of normal). Isolated areas in this bread basket of Kenya received beneficial rains (22-56 mm; 89-130% of normal), though. Sizable amounts of rains (43-53 mm; 188-203% of normal) also fell over portions of the climatologically semi-arid areas of eastern Kenya. Dry conditions continued to prevail in north, except locally in the northwest. Moderate rains (18-53 mm; 82-222% of normal) benefited central and southern , while seasonable dryness prevailed over Sudan. In the southern part of the region, heavy rains (92-147 mm; 235-327% of normal) soaked local areas along the northern coast of Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated light to moderate rains (10-25 mm) over the southern areas of Somalia and Sudan, most of Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. The rainfall estimates were locally heavy (50-75 mm) over portions of northwestern and southwestern Tanzania. Dry conditions prevailed over central and northern Somalia, Djibouti, and Eritrea. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C below normal.
  • March 1-10 2006 - Moderate to heavy rains (5-92 mm; 97-653% of normal) sustained moisture over southwestern Kenya and pockets in the northwest, marking a good start to the long season rains. Locally moderate rains (9-46 mm; 100-479% of normal) also fell over pockets in southern Ethiopia and southern Sudan. Elsewhere, satellite rainfall estimates indicated heavy downpours (75-200 mm) across southern and central Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi. Rainfall estimates were lighter and ranged between 10 and 50 mm over most of Uganda, while dry conditions prevailed across most of Ethiopia and Somalia, worsening the drought situation in those areas. Seasonable dryness prevailed over Djibouti, most of Eritrea and northern Sudan. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C below normal across the region.
  • February 2006 - Seasonable dryness prevailed across most parts in the region, including most of Sudan, western Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Somalia. However, late February rains contributed to above average conditions over central and southern Ethiopia and southwestern Kenya. Rainfall totals in those areas averaged 33-60 mm (100-433% of normal) Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 25-50 mm over central and southern Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi.
  • February 21-28 2006 - Moderate to heavy rains 24-60 mm; 320-528% of normal) returned over pockets in southwestern Kenya, following the severe moisture deficit registered in this region during the short rains (October - December 2005). Light to moderate rains (4-23 mm) also fell locally over the northern areas of Kenya. The southern areas of Ethiopia also received early moderate rains (10-29 mm; 109-355% of normal). Satellite rainfall estimates indicated light to moderate rains across Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda. Seasonable dryness continued to prevail over Sudan, western Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Somalia. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above normal over Kenya.
  • January 11-20 2006 - Moderate to heavy unseasonable rains fell over southwestern and eastern Kenya, northeastern Tanzania, and around the Lake Victoria. The rains are too late to alleviate impacts from the October-December severe rainfall deficits. Elsewhere in the region seasonably dry conditions prevailed. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • December 2005 - Light rains sustained moisture deficits across Kenya and Tanzania, and worsened the dryness pattern established early on in the season. The crop growing areas of Kenya received only 1-21 mm (1-28% of normal). In Tanzania, rainfall amounts varied between 1 and 116 mm (1-56% of normal). This drying trend extended to northern Uganda and the southern areas of Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia, where clear sky prevailed. However, satellite rainfall estimates revealed light to moderate rains (25-100 mm) over portions of central Ethiopia, southern Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. Seasonable dryness prevailed in the northern areas of Sudan and Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and northern Somalia.
  • December 21-31 2005 - The rainy season ended as it started with very little or no rain in the region, making the 2005 short rains one of the worst in the historical record. Sporadic light rains (1-10 mm; 2-59% of normal) fell over pockets of southwestern Kenya. However, most places in this climatologically wet region of the Horn and across almost all of Kenya, Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Somalia. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 10-25 mm over southern Rwanda, Burundi, and locally over central Ethiopia. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • December 11-20 2005 - Dryness worsened as clear skies prevailed across most of the region. Not even a single drop of rain fell across the crop growing areas of central and southwestern Kenya. Dry conditions also prevailed across northern Kenya, Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, most of Sudan and Ethiopia. Extremely light rain (1-3 mm; 7-10% of normal) fell along the southern coastline of Kenya. Satellite rainfall estimation indicated 1-10 mm locally over central Ethiopia, the southern half of Uganda, most of Rwanda and Burundi. Rainfall estimates were heavier and ranged between 10 and 25 mm over portions of southern and western Tanzania. Dry conditions prevailed over northern Tanzania. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 4 degrees C across Kenya.
  • December 1-10 2005 - The pattern of poor rains continued as light or no rain fell across the region. Measurable rains were limited to southern Kenya, where records ranged between 4 and 24 mm (11-75% of normal). Scattered light rains (1-12 mm; 2-40% of normal) also fell over northern Kenya, northern Tanzania, and locally over Rwanda. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 10-25 mm over Burundi and southern Uganda, while amounts reached 25-75 mm locally over central Ethiopia. Dry conditions prevailed over most of Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, northern and southern Ethiopia, and most of Sudan. The exceptions to the overall dryness pattern were areas in the vicinity of Lake Victoria, which received 25-98 mm (78-197% of normal). Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • November 2005 - November rainfall was negligible over most of Ethiopiaís Somali region and southward through Somalia outside of the extreme southern part of the country, which saw 50 to 150 mm (about normal). Kenya fared better, with amounts ranging from 20 to 240 mm (25-100 percent of normal, isolated 330 percent of normal on the coast). This was the second consecutive month with significant dry anomalies over southern Ethiopia and southern Somalia. In Kenya, despite scattered heavy showers, most of the country experienced below-normal rainfall. Northeastern Uganda also registered below-normal rainfall for the second month, while Tanzania saw below-normal rainfall as well except in far western areas. Overall rainfall across the region was below normal except for central and northern Ethiopia. Temperatures averaged near normal.
  • November 21-30 2005 - Variable rains of 20 to 60 mm (50-220 percent of normal) benefited dry areas in central and eastern Kenya, but rainfall was spotty toward the north and northwest, with little rain across northern Uganda and northwest Kenya. Despite a few showers in south-central Ethiopia, little or no rain fell across southern parts of the country and over Somalia. An exception was far southern Somalia, where satellite data suggested amounts of 10-50 mm. Reported rainfall totals ranged from 0 to 9 mm over most of Tanzania (0-60 percent of normal). The short rains season may be on track for a complete failure in most of southern Somalia and adjacent Ethiopia, while conditions also remain unusually dry over many parts of Kenya and Tanzania, as well as across northeastern Uganda. Temperatures averaging 2 to 4 degrees C above normal aggravated dryness in western Kenya, although near normal readings along with scattered heavy showers eased drought in eastern Kenya.
  • November 1-10 2005 - Light rains (2-59 mm; 16-61% of normal) persisted across most of Kenya. The exceptions were local areas in the southwestern and central parts, where rainfall amounts ranged between 57 and 151 mm; 131-186% of normal). Coastal Kenya also received their heaviest rains for the season as amounts ranged between 84 and 93 mm (over 200% of normal). Moderate to heavy rains (30-62 mm; 83-268% of normal) hit northwestern Uganda as well as local areas in the southeast and in the vicinity of Lake Victoria. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated dry conditions over eastern Tanzania, while western half of the country as well Rwanda and Burundi received 10-50 mm. Sporadic light rains fell across southern the southern areas of Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia. The rainfall estimates were locally heavy over the southwestern Ethiopian highlands. Seasonable dryness prevailed over central and northern Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, and the northern areas of Ethiopia and Sudan. Temperatures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • October 2005 - Despite locally moderate to heavy rains (67-147 mm; 84-110% of normal) in portions of central and southwestern Kenya, most crop growing areas in Kenya registered a delay in the onset of the rains as light to moderate rains (5-82 mm; 8-66% of normal) prevailed. Light to moderate rains (25-100 mm) also sustained moisture deficits over central and western Ethiopia, eastern Uganda, Burundi, and portions of southern Sudan. However, moderate to heavy rains (100-200 mm) fell over western Uganda, Rwanda, and portions of southern Sudan. Dry conditions prevailed over southern and central Somalia, while light to moderate rains fell locally in the north. Seasonable dryness prevailed over Djibouti and Eritrea.
  • October 21-31 2005 - Beneficial rains (12-113 mm; 84-160% of normal) fell over portions of southwestern Kenya and locally over the western and northern areas of the country. However, light rains persisted across the eastern sector and over parts of the southwest in the vicinity of Lake Victoria. Light rains (2-22 mm; 7-46% of normal) also prevailed across eastern Uganda and across most of northern Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated moderate rains (25-75 mm) across western Uganda, portions of southern Sudan, locally over the western Ethiopian highlands, and most of Rwanda. Rainfall estimates were lighter across Burundi and ranged between 10 and 25 mm. Light or no rain persisted across most of central and eastern Ethiopia, and Somalia. Seasonable dryness prevailed across Djibouti and Eritrea. Temperatures were generally near average across Kenya.
  • October 11-20 2005 - Moderate rains (25-79 mm; 81-179% of normal brought relief to local areas in southwestern Kenya and southeastern Uganda. However, light rains (1-40 mm; 1-63% of normal) sustained moisture deficit across most crop areas in Kenya these two countries. Satellite rainfall estimates also indicated moisture deficit across the Ethiopian highlands, central Somalia, and Burundi. Rainfall estimates in those areas ranged between 1 and 25 mm. Rainfall estimates were heavier (10-50 mm) across southern Sudan, the Lake Victoria, and Rwanda. Seasonable dryness prevailed across Eritrea, Djibouti, and most of northern Ethiopia. Temperatures were near normal across Kenya.
  • October 1-10 2005 - Light rains sustained moisture deficits early in the season in most parts of the region. Southwestern Kenya registered only 2-18 mm (2-44% of normal), while according to satellite rainfall estimation, dry conditions prevailed in the remainder of the country. Dry conditions also prevailed across most of Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, eastern Uganda, southern Ethiopia, southern Somali, Djibouti, and most of Eritrea, and local areas in southeastern Sudan. Rainfall estimates were light (1-25 mm) across central and western Uganda. They were heavier (10-75 mm) across central Sudan and across the western Ethiopian highlands. Seasonable dryness prevailed across northern Sudan. Temperatures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • September 2005 - The early showers in the second 10-day period resulted in enhanced rainfall activity over southwestern Kenya as rainfall amounts ranged between 79 and 166 mm (79-206% of normal). Moderate to heavy rains (50-150 mm) fell over the southern and portions of the central areas of Sudan, the Ethiopian western highlands, most of Uganda, the Lake Victoria, and Rwanda. Lighter rains (25-50 mm) fell over Burundi and portions of Eritrea. Dry conditions prevailed over Djibouti, Somalia, eastern Kenya, and most of Tanzania.
  • September 21-30 2005 - Light rains (1-27 mm; 10-64% of normal) fell across most of central and southern Sudan, except local areas that registered 7-24 mm (102-139% of normal). Sporadic light rains (1-3 mm) fell across southwestern and northeastern Kenya, while dry conditions prevailed across Uganda and along most of the Lake Victoria shore line. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated light to moderate rains (10-25 mm) across Rwanda and Burundi. The estimates were intense (50-100 mm) across the western Ethiopian Highlands. Light to moderate rains (10-25 mm) fell over portions of southern Eritrea, while dry conditions prevailed to the north. Dry conditions also prevailed across eastern Ethiopia and Somalia. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • September 11-20 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (14-136 mm; 107-570% of normal) soaked southwestern Kenya marking an early onset of the short rains in this area. Wet conditions also prevailed in the vicinity of the Lake Victoria with rainfall amounts between 19 and 61 mm (196-274% of normal). Sporadic moderate to heavy rains (174-47 mm; 104-440% of normal) fell over local areas across central Sudan. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 10-75 mm across southern Sudan, western Ethiopia, most of Uganda, and Rwanda. Lighter rains fell across Burundi and Djibouti. Dry conditions prevailed across Tanzania, eastern Kenya, Somalia, and eastern Ethiopia. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above average across southwestern Kenya.
  • September 1-10 2005 - Rainfall was below average across central Sudan, except some local areas that registered 18-48 mm (92-171% of normal). Wet conditions (20-49 mm; 90-316% of normal) prevailed in the neighboring areas of the Lake Victoria, while light rains (1-17 mm; 2-62% of normal) fell over central Kenya. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated seasonable dryness across Tanzania, eastern Kenya, Somalia, and eastern Ethiopia. Rainfall estimates ranged between 10 and 50 mm across central and western Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti. Temperatures were generally near average across Kenya
  • August 2005 - August rainfall was generally above normal in western and central Sudan, as estimated totals ranged up to 250 mm in western Darfur. Amounts tended to be below normal from southern Sudan into northwestern Kenya and southern Ethiopia. Near normal (70-130 mm) rains fell in western Kenya, while eastern Kenya was seasonably dry, as was Somalia and Tanzania. Temperatures were near normal.
  • August 21-31 2005 - Overall rainfall amounts were close to normal, with lower totals in Sudan and Ethiopia easing the flood threat for the Blue Nile basin in Sudan. Satellite data indicated that some of the heavy rains that hit Chad also affected western Darfur in Sudan, as estimated totals exceeded 75 mm. Most locations in Somalia, southern Ethiopia, and eastern Kenya were seasonably dry. Moderate rainfall of 25 to 50 mm covered western Kenya and northern Uganda. Temperatures across the region were generally near normal.
  • August 11-20 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (37-86 mm; 93-178% of normal) sustained moisture over crop many areas in central and southern Sudan, including the Darfur region. However, rainfall was light (1-39 mm; 1-58% of normal) in the east central areas of the country. Unseasonably wet weather once again prevailed across southwestern Kenya, where rainfall amounts ranged between 5 and 113mm. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated substantial rains (75-150 mm) across western Ethiopia. Rainfall estimates were lighter and ranged between 10 and 50 mm across northwestern Eritrea, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. Dry conditions prevailed over southeastern Eritrea, while seasonable dryness prevailed across Tanzania, northern and eastern Kenya, and Somalia. Temperatures averaged 1 degree above normal across Kenya.
  • August 1-10 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (68-138 mm; 108-332% of normal) sustained moisture over crop areas in Sudan, including the Darfur region. Unseasonably wet weather prevailed across most Kenya, where rainfall amounts in the southwest ranged between 33 and 71mm. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated substantial rains (50-150 mm) across northern Eritrea and eastern Ethiopia. Rainfall estimates were lighter (10-25 mm) over most of Uganda and Djibouti, while dry conditions prevailed across eastern Ethiopia, Somalia, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi. Temperatures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal over southwestern Kenya.
  • July 2005 - Sudanís estimated rainfall generally reached near to above-normal levels, with potentially excessive totals in the northeastern agricultural areas (over 160 percent of normal) and possibly below-normal amounts in northeastern Darfur. Ethiopia and Eritrea saw mostly near normal amounts, while Uganda and Kenya posted generally near to above-normal totals. Temperatures averaged near normal.
  • July 21-31 2005 - Rainfall picked up this period in Sudan, where amounts totaled around 25 to 100 mm (90-125 percent of normal) in the crop areas, according to satellite estimates. To the east, seasonably heavy rains (25-100 mm) fell across central and western Ethiopia. Substantial rains fell across Eritrea, which had been somewhat dry last period. Seasonably dry weather prevailed in southern Ethiopia, Somalia, eastern Kenya, and Tanzania. Above-normal rains, with reports of up to 100 mm or more, fell on western Kenya. Rains were also mainly above normal to the west in Uganda. Temperatures averaged around 2 degrees C above normal in western Kenya and near normal elsewhere.
  • July 11-20 2005 - The wetter pattern seen during early July in Ethiopia continued this period, with satellite-estimated amounts mostly ranging from 50 to 150 mm in central and western portions of the country. These totals are close to expected amounts for this time of the year. To the west, amounts were abnormally light in central Sudan, where estimated totals stayed well under 25 mm (less than 25 percent of normal). Above-normal rains persisted in western Sudan in the Darfur region, where satellite estimates topped 50 mm in some locations. Rains were typical in Kenya for July, varying from 2 to 50 mm in the west and negligible in the east and north. Long-term drought persisted in interior eastern Kenya. Temperatures were near normal.
  • July 1-10 2005 - The rains picked up considerably in Ethiopia, satellite estimates ranging from 50 to over 100 mm (125-200 percent of normal) across central and western areas. In contrast, southern areas remained seasonably dry. Sudan experienced mostly normal to above-normal rainfall while unseasonably heavy rains pelted northern coastal areas of Kenya and extreme southern Somalia. Coastal Kenya registered up to 228 mm, which is more than 10 times normal. Variable rains of 0 to 39 mm (0-239 percent of normal) fell over central and western Kenya, but the long-term drought persisted over interior eastern Kenya. Reported temperatures were generally unremarkable across the region.
  • June 2005 - Seasonal rains were underway across the western highlands of Ethiopia and Eritrea. 150 to 350 mm of rain fell over western Tigray, western Ahmara, Beneshangul Gumuz and western Oromiya (80-130% of normal). Rain moved into eastern Ahmara, eastern Tigray and the Eritrean Highlands ahead of schedule. This resulted in a wetter than average June (25-100 mm; 100-250% of normal). However, June was drier than normal across central Oromiya and SNNPR where rainfall was more scattered than usual (25-100 mm; 30-60% of normal). In Sudan, the season started early across Darfur and Kurdufan. Average to above average rainfall occurred across central and most of southern Sudan. Satellite rainfall estimates indicate that 25 to 150 mm of rain fell during June across central and southeastern Sudan, with up to 300+ mm over southwestern Sudan. This is 100 to 200% of normal. However, June rainfall was 200 to 400% of normal across central parts of Darfur and Kurdufan where the 2005 rainy season started early. Further south, rainfall was normal to above normal across southern and western Uganda (30-150 mm; 100-150% of normal). Rainfall was normal to below normal for the month of June across eastern Uganda and southwestern Kenya (8-106 mm; 6-122% of normal). Along the coast of Kenya and northeastern Tanzania, June was dry (4-61 mm; 2-48% of normal). The exception was in Mombassa, where 114 mm of rain fell (119% of normal). Conditions were seasonably dry across interior Tanzania. Temperatures were generally near normal across the Greater Horn for June 2005.
  • June 21-30 2005 - Beneficial seasonal rains fell across western parts of the Ethiopian highlands. Moderate to locally heavy rain fell over western Tigray, western Ahmara, Beneshangul Gumuz and western Oromiya (20-80 mm; 70-120% of normal). These rains extended north into the Eritrean Highlands. Lighter showers were reported over central Oromiya and northern SNNPR (5-20 mm; 50-80% of normal), where short term dryness has become a concern. Seasonably dry conditions were reported over Afar, Somali and southern Oromiya. In Sudan, seasonal rains started 1 to 3 dekads early across southern parts of the Darfur and Kurdufan regions. Seasonal showers produced 10-50 mm of rainfall across central and southern Sudan, with up to 100 mm across southwestern parts of the country. Further south, variable showers fell across Uganda, Lake Victoria and southwestern parts of Kenya (0-58 mm; 0-215% of normal). Spotty light showers fell across northern Kenya, with light rain reported along the Kenya Coast (4-18 mm; 22-91 % of normal). Conditions were seasonably dry over most of Tanzania, Somalia, Rwanda and Burundi. Temperatures across Africaís Greater Horn were generally near normal.
  • June 11-20 2005 - Beneficial seasonal rains fell across the highlands of western Tigray, western Ahmara, western Oromiya, and Beneshangul Gumuz in Ethiopia (25-100 mm). Beneficial seasonal rains were also observed over the highlands of western Eritrea (10-60 mm). Showers fell across Ethiopiaís southern highlands and across the Ahmar Mountains (1-25 mm). Conditions were seasonably dry over the highlands of eastern Tigray and eastern Ahmara, where seasonal rains typically begin in early to mid July. Across the lower elevations of the Afar region, conditions were also dry. Seasonal rains typically fall across Afar during late July, August and early September. In the pastoral areas of eastern and southern Ethiopia, Somalia and northeastern Kenya, conditions were dry as the dry season is underway. Along the Kenya coast, showers were observed, but rainfall amounts were lighter than normal (15-30 mm, 50-55% of normal). Light to moderate rain fell over southwestern Kenya (18-33 mm; 91-225% of normal), with variable showers in Uganda and those portions of Tanzania adjacent to Lake Victoria (1-33 mm; 1-125% of normal). In Sudan, seasonal rains fell across central and southern portions of the country (20-70 mm). Seasonal rains have started in southern portions of Darfur and Kurdufan, with the ITCZ generally at its climatological position across Sudan. Temperatures across East Africa generally averaged within 2 degrees Celsius of normal.
  • June 1-10 2005 - Rainfall eased in southwest Kenya as spotty light rains (2-33 mm; 54-87% of normal) fell across the area. Dry conditions prevailed in the remainder of the country, except locally along the southern coast, where rainfall amounts ranged between 83 and 87 mm (165-170% of normal). Satellite rainfall estimates also indicated dry conditions across Tanzania, most of Somalia, and eastern Ethiopia. Rainfall estimates ranged only between 1 and 10 mm across Rwanda, Burundi, the central areas of Uganda and Ethiopia, Djibouti, and eastern Eritrea. They ranged between 10 and 50 mm over western Uganda and portions of central Sudan, including the Darfur area. The heaviest estimates (75-150 mm) were confined to southwestern Sudan and western Ethiopia, once again sustaining moisture on those areas. Temperatures averaged 1 degree C above normal across Kenya.
  • May 2005 - Widespread rains fell over Kenya. The heaviest amounts (113-339 mm; 119-241% of normal) occurred in the southwest, while local areas in the north and southeast received (30-246 mm; 86-260% of normal). However, the coastal areas experienced rainfall deficit with totals between 125 and 282 mm (47-78% of normal). Moderate to heavy rains (69-108 mm; 86-287% of normal) also fell along the Tanzanian coast and along the southern coast line of the Lake Victoria. In contrast, most of Uganda experienced suppressed rainfall activity. Rainfall amounts ranged between 10 and 91 mm (12-67% of normal). The only exceptions were local areas in the northwest, where rainfall amounts ranged between 190 and 200 mm (125-135% of normal). Scattered moderate rains (11-102 mm; 118-544% of normal) fell over parts of central Sudan. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated heavy downpours (150-250 mm) across the southern areas of Ethiopia and Sudan. They ranged between 25 and 100 mm over central Sudan, northern and eastern Ethiopia, most of Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia, Rwanda, and Burundi.
  • May 21-31-2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (46-292 mm; 115-437% of normal) soaked the already wet soils in southwest Kenya and flooding may recur in some local areas. The rains extended westward to cover the Lake Victoria basin and Rwanda. Rainfall amounts in these areas ranged between 32 and 204 mm (94-255% of normal). However, lighter rains (2-15 mm; 19-33% of normal) fell over most of Uganda. Beneficial rains (13-131 mm; 54-302% of normal) fell over the northern and central areas of Kenya as well as along the coast. Unseasonably moderate to heavy rains (26-139 mm; 155-333% of normal) fell over northeastern Tanzania. Light to moderate rains (7-40 mm; 141-385% of normal) marked the onset of the seasonal rains over most areas in central Sudan. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated heavy downpours (50-150 mm) across the eastern and southern areas of Ethiopia, sustaining moisture in many parts of the belg area. However, little or no rain prevailed in central and portions of northern Ethiopia, eastern Eritrea, and Djibouti. Light to moderate rains (10-25 mm) fell over western Eritrea, while rainfall estimates ranged between 25 and 75 mm across central and portions of southern Somalia. Lighter rains though, fell over northern Somalia. Temperatures were generally near normal across Kenya.
  • May 11-20 2005 - Light to moderate rains (1-44 mm; 2-57% of normal) relieved previously flooded areas in southwest Kenya. Light to moderate rains (23-58 mm; 24-70% of normal) persisted along coastal Kenya, heavy rains (72-99 mm; 341-766% of normal) fell locally over the southeastern and north central areas. Rainfall also eased across Uganda as showers ranged between 7 and 18 mm (27-35% of normal) across most of the country, except locally heavy rains in the northwest. Moderate to heavy rains (25-164 mm; 87-331% of normal) fell over portions of the northeastern Tanzania and along the northeast coast. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated locally heavy rains (50-150 mm) over portions of southwestern and central Ethiopia, resulting in flooding in some areas. Rainfall estimates were lighter (10-50 mm) across Djibouti, and northern and central Somalia, while dry conditions prevailed over most of the southern areas of Somalia and over Eritrea. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • May 1-10 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (59-106 mm; 81-202% of normal) persisted over southwestern Kenya, resulting in local flooding in the area. Moderate rains (14-72 mm; 84-88% of normal) fell locally over portions of southeastern Kenya, while little or no rain fell in the north and northeastern sectors. Moderate to heavy rains (47-150 mm; 91-261% of normal) also soaked northwestern Uganda and local areas in northwestern Tanzania in the vicinity of the Lake Victoria. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated moderate rains (10-50 mm) across the western half of Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, and southern Uganda. The rains extended northward and became heavier (75-150 mm) across northern Uganda, southern Sudan, most of the crop areas of Ethiopia, and the northern tip of Somalia. Rainfall estimates ranged between 1 and 25 mm over central Sudan, most of Somalia, and portions of Djibouti. Dry conditions prevailed across Eritrea, northern Sudan, and the eastern half of Tanzania. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across the region.
  • April 2005 - Rainfall was below average across most of southwestern Kenya, where rainfall totals ranged between 33 and 123 mm (12-73% of normal). The exceptions were local areas that received beneficial rains (97-161 mm; 80-99% of normal). Beneficial rains (120-167 mm; 84-113% of normal) also fell locally over portions of northern and southeastern Kenya. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated 25-100 mm over most of Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda. Beneficial rains continued to fall over the belg region of Ethiopia, while most of Somalia and Djibouti received 25-50 mm. Seasonal rains returned to southern Sudan, while the north and Eritrea remained dry.
  • April 21-30 2005 - Spotty moderate to heavy rains (47-11 mm; 84-198% of normal) fell over portions of southwestern and northern Kenya and in the vicinity of the Lake Victoria in northwestern Tanzania. Light to moderate rains (1-58 mm; 4-79% of normal) extended from eastern Kenya southward into Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated little or no rain across the southern and central areas of Tanzania and Sudan, most of Eritrea, and the northern tip of Somalia. Rainfall estimates ranged between 10 and 50 mm across Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, most of Somalia, portions of southeastern and north central Ethiopia, and southern Sudan. The estimates were heaviest in the Belg region of Ethiopia and ranged between 50 and 150 mm. Temperature departures averaged 1 to 2 degrees above normal across Kenya.
  • April 11-20 2005 - Rainfall eased substantially across southwest Kenya as amounts ranged between 1 and 33 mm (1-67% of normal). However, locally moderate o heavy rains (20-163 mm; 80-236% of normal) fell over portions of southeast and northeast Kenya, northwestern Tanzania, and Rwanda. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated beneficial rains (50-100 mm) over portions of the belg region of Ethiopia, southern Uganda, and locally over the southern areas of Sudan. Rainfall estimates were lighter and ranged between 1 and 25 mm across most of Somalia, northern Ethiopia, Djibouti, and eastern Eritrea. Dry conditions prevailed across western Eritrea, western Ethiopia, northern and central Sudan. Temperatures averaged 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • April 1-10 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (27-262 mm; 82-600% of normal) continued to fall over southwestern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Moderate rains (31-51 mm; 106-130% of normal) also fell over southeastern Kenya, while the northern sectors received their first rains (2-14 mm; 9-137% of normal) for the season. However, light rains (1-17 mm; 3-26% of normal sustained moisture deficit in most of the central areas. Light rains (6-67 mm; 9-68% of normal) also fell across central Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated moderate to heavy rains (10-75 mm across Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda. Dry conditions prevailed across most of Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti, the northern and central areas of Somalia and Ethiopia. However, moderate to heavy rains (10-50 mm) returned to some localities in the belg region of Ethiopia. Temperatures were generally 1 to 3 degrees C below normal across Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania.
  • March 2005 - Light to moderate rains (1-138 mm; 1-71% of normal) fell over most of southwestern Kenya, except some local areas that registered 149-213 mm; 94-111% of normal). Lighter rains 1-65 mm; 3-78% of normal) fell in the southeast and along the coast, while dry conditions prevailed in the north. Moderate to heavy rains (89-254 mm; 80-147% of normal) spread most of Tanzania. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated a good start to the rainy season in the belg and central areas of Ethiopia as moderate to heavy rains (50-150 mm) fell in this region. Rainfall estimates were moderate to heavy (100-200 mm) across Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. Seasonable dryness prevailed across Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, and Sudan.
  • March 21-31 2005 - Moderate to heavy rains (31-119 mm; 96-341% of normal) sustained moisture over southwestern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Light rains (2-18 mm;1-44% of normal) fell over most of central and southeastern Kenya, though locally heavy rains (60-70 mm) fell along the northern coast. Satellite rainfall estimates indicated heavy downpours (75-150 mm) across central and eastern Tanzania. Rainfall estimates were lighter across Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi, where they ranged between 10 and 75 mm. Light rains (10-25 mm) eased wetness across central and southern Ethiopia, while seasonable dryness prevailed across eastern Ethiopia, Somalia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and most of Sudan. Temperatures were generally 1 to 2 degrees C below normal across Uganda. They were 1 to 2 degrees C above normal across Kenya.
  • March 11-20 2005 - Beneficial rains (22-174 mm; 104-228% of normal) fell over southwestern Kenya and in the vicinity of the Lake Victoria. Moderate rains (20-59 mm; 85-127% of normal) fell locally along the southern coast of Kenya and coastal Tanzania. However, satellite rainfall estimates indicated dry conditions across most of Kenya, while moderate rains (25-75 mm) sustained moisture in the belg region of Ethiopia. The rains extended northward into the northern areas of Ethiopia and Djibouti. Seasonable dryness prevailed across eastern Ethiopia, most of Somalia, Eritrea, and Sudan. Rainfall estimates ranged between 25 and 100 mm over Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi. Temperatures were near average across the region.
  • March 1-10 2005 - After a good start during the previous period, the long rains stalled in southwestern Kenya as spotty light rains (1-16 mm; 3-51% of normal) fell throughout this area. Dry conditions prevailed in the remainder of the country. In contrast, rainfall estimates (10-50 mm) confirmed a good start to the rainy season in southern and central Ethiopia, most of Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and northern Tanzania. Rainfall estimates were even heavier (50-100 mm) over most of southern Tanzania. Seasonably dry conditions prevailed over Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, and Sudan. Temperatures were generally 1 to 3 degrees C above normal across Kenya and Tanzania.

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